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Taskfile Versions

The Taskfile syntax and features changed with time. This document explains what changed on each version and how to upgrade your Taskfile.

What the Taskfile version mean

The Taskfile version follows the Task version. E.g. the change to Taskfile version 2 means that Task v2.0.0 should be release to support it.

The version: key on Taskfile accepts a semver string, so either 2, 2.0 or 2.0.0 is accepted. If you choose to use 2.0 Task will not enable future 2.1 features, but if you choose to use 2, then any 2.x.x features will be available, but not 3.0.0+.

Version 3 latest

These are some major changes done on v3:

  • Task's output will now be colored
  • Added support for .env like files
  • Added label: setting to task so one can override how the task name appear in the logs
  • A global method: was added to allow setting the default method, and Task's default changed to checksum
  • Two magic variables were added when using status:: CHECKSUM and TIMESTAMP which contains, respectively, the XXH3 checksum and greatest modification timestamp of the files listed on sources:
  • Also, the TASK variable is always available with the current task name
  • CLI variables are always treated as global variables
  • Added dir: option to includes to allow choosing on which directory an included Taskfile will run:
includes:
docs:
taskfile: ./docs
dir: ./docs
  • Implemented short task syntax. All below syntaxes are equivalent:
version: '3'

tasks:
print:
cmds:
- echo "Hello, World!"
version: '3'

tasks:
print:
- echo "Hello, World!"
version: '3'

tasks:
print: echo "Hello, World!"
  • There was a major refactor on how variables are handled. They're now easier to understand. The expansions: setting was removed as it became unnecessary. This is the order in which Task will process variables, each level can see the variables set by the previous one and override those.
    • Environment variables
    • Global + CLI variables
    • Call variables
    • Task variables

Version 2.6

Version 2.6 comes with preconditions stanza in tasks.

version: '2'

tasks:
upload_environment:
preconditions:
- test -f .env
cmds:
- aws s3 cp .env s3://myenvironment

Please check the documentation

Version 2.2

Version 2.2 comes with a global includes options to include other Taskfiles:

version: '2'

includes:
docs: ./documentation # will look for ./documentation/Taskfile.yml
docker: ./DockerTasks.yml

Version 2.1

Version 2.1 includes a global output option, to allow having more control over how commands output are printed to the console (see documentation for more info):

version: '2'

output: prefixed

tasks:
server:
cmds:
- go run main.go
prefix: server

From this version it's also possible to ignore errors of a command or task (check documentation here):

version: '2'

tasks:
example-1:
cmds:
- cmd: exit 1
ignore_error: true
- echo "This will be print"

example-2:
cmds:
- exit 1
- echo "This will be print"
ignore_error: true

Version 2.0

At version 2, we introduced the version: key, to allow us to evolve Task with new features without breaking existing Taskfiles. The new syntax is as follows:

version: '2'

tasks:
echo:
cmds:
- echo "Hello, World!"

Version 2 allows you to write global variables directly in the Taskfile, if you don't want to create a Taskvars.yml:

version: '2'

vars:
GREETING: Hello, World!

tasks:
greet:
cmds:
- echo "{{.GREETING}}"

The variable priority order changed to the following:

  1. Task variables
  2. Call variables
  3. Taskfile variables
  4. Taskvars file variables
  5. Environment variables

A new global option was added to configure the number of variables expansions (which default to 2):

version: '2'

expansions: 3

vars:
FOO: foo
BAR: bar
BAZ: baz
FOOBAR: '{{.FOO}}{{.BAR}}'
FOOBARBAZ: '{{.FOOBAR}}{{.BAZ}}'

tasks:
default:
cmds:
- echo "{{.FOOBARBAZ}}"

Version 1

caution

v1 schema support was removed in Task >= v3.0.0.

In the first version of the Taskfile, the version: key was not available, because the tasks was in the root of the YAML document. Like this:

echo:
cmds:
- echo "Hello, World!"

The variable priority order was also different:

  1. Call variables
  2. Environment
  3. Task variables
  4. Taskvars.yml variables